Home > English > Tips for Writing: Entering the Conversation

Tips for Writing: Entering the Conversation

When an author is embarking on a new literary quest, he or she must consider several different factors when planning an effective article. One of the most important factors that the author must take into account is which method of “entering the conversation” will be used in the paper to most effectively introduce his or her opinion. It is vital for the author establish the purpose of his or her discourse before attempting to dissect the subject at hand. After establishing the purpose, the author must consider the general body of work that has been done about the particular subject being written about. Once this has been mapped, the author has several different options when deciding how he or she will add their opinion to the general body of work that has been established regarding the subject of focus for the paper.

One of these options is clearly seen within the article “Fat as a Feminist Issue” by Susie Orbach. Within her article, she is tackling the issue of obesity in women; however, she is approaching the subject from a unique angle. This makes her argument something that “no one is talking about”. Orbach is introducing a completely new idea to the area of female obesity. She states that women eat compulsively and have become fat in order to break forth from the mold that society casts for their gender.

In this article, she is not necessarily responding to a specific argument for or against obesity in women. Instead, she is filling in a gap in the overall body of work for this issue and actually introducing a new idea as to why the percentage of obese women continues to grow in America. This technique is effective, but there are other options for authors that include stating what “they say” explicitly, which is extremely effective when introducing an alternate opinion. This is a strong technique because the author is able to address each argument that the opposition utilizes in a point-by-point writing style that allows he or she to introduce his or her counterpoint to each of these arguments.

This technique is used in the article “Being Fat is OK” by Paul Campos. Within this article, Campos is attacking the overall picture of how America defines obesity based on a system that uses the body mass index as the indicator for obesity and overall healthiness. He is also attacking those who claim that every overweight person would be better if he or she lost weight. The main thrust of his argument is the lack of scientific evidence that exists to support this argument. He explicitly states what the opposition says and then introduces his counterpoint in each example within the article. Another reason that this technique is effective is because it leaves no doubt what the author is attempting to communicate to the reader.

When the author is “entering the conversation” he or she must consider what mode of presentation will be most effective in relaying his or her specific contribution within the subject to the audience. Regardless of what method is ultimately chosen, it is overwhelmingly apparent that this specific aspect of writing can make or break a paper and must be given considerable weight during the planning phase for the article.

Works Cited

Graff, G., Birkenstein, C., & Durst, R. (2009). The Moves That Matter In Academic Writing: They say I say (, pp. 463-481). New York: W.W. Norton & Company .

Advertisements
  1. No comments yet.
  1. No trackbacks yet.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: